Renewable energy is generally defined as energy that comes from resources which are naturally replenished on a human timescale such as sunlight, wind, rain, tides, waves and geothermal heat

A number of products are available, many of which are eligible for the Domestic Renewable Heat Incentive (RHI)
The Domestic Renewable Heat Incentive (RHI) is a government financial incentive to encourage a switch to renewable heating systems. If you join and comply with the scheme rules, you’ll receive quarterly payments for seven years. It’s a way to help the UK reduce its carbon emissions. The scheme is available for households both off and on the gas grid. Those without mains gas have the most potential to save on fuel bills and decrease carbon emissions.

It’s not enough just to have one of the types of renewable heating systems that are eligible for the scheme. The make and model must also meet specific technical requirements. When the scheme opens, Ofgem will publish a list of products that you can check against.

The eligible heating system types are:

Biomass pellet stoves and integrated boilers.

Wood-fuelled heating systems, also called biomass systems, burn wood pellets, chips or logs to to provide warmth in a single room or to power central heating and hot water boilers.

A stove burns logs or pellets to heat a single room – and may be fitted with a back boiler to provide water heating as well.A boiler burns logs, pellets or chips, and is connected to a central heating and hot water system. A wood-fuelled boiler could save you up to £650 a year compared to old electric heating.

Air source heat pumps.

Air source heat pumps absorb heat from the outside air. This heat can then be used to heat radiators, underfloor heating systems, or warm air convectors and hot water in your home.

An air source heat pump extracts heat from the outside air in the same way that a fridge extracts heat from its inside. It can get heat from the air even when the temperature is as low as -15° C. Heat pumps have some impact on the environment as they need electricity to run, but the heat they extract from the ground, air, or water is constantly being renewed naturally.

Ground source heat pumps.

Ground source heat pumps use pipes which are buried in the garden to extract heat from the ground. This heat can then be used to heat radiators, underfloor or warm air heating systems and hot water in your home.

A ground source heat pump circulates a mixture of water and antifreeze around a loop of pipe – called a ground loop – which is buried in your garden. Heat from the ground is absorbed into the fluid and then passes through a heat exchanger into the heat pump. The ground stays at a fairly constant temperature under the surface, so the heat pump can be used throughout the year – even in the middle of winter.

The length of the ground loop depends on the size of your home and the amount of heat you need. Longer loops can draw more heat from the ground, but need more space to be buried in. If space is limited, a vertical borehole can be drilled instead.

Solar thermal panels – flat plate or evacuated tube only

Solar water heating systems use free heat from the sun to warm domestic hot water. A conventional boiler or immersion heater can be used to make the water hotter, or to provide hot water when solar energy is unavailable.

Please contact us to discuss the range of products and arrange a free, no obligation consultation.